Being Thankful and Paying it Forward

The inspiration for today’s post came just in the nick of time for Thanksgiving.

Have you stopped to appreciate any of the gifts surrounding you?  I know some people who regularly ask themselves and share openly with others the 3 things that happened that day for which they were most grateful.  Gratitude is an important component of self care.  Gratitude is important for good health and well being, in general.

First, I’d like to share the 5 things my daughter is thankful for in this picture (I’m so proud of her work):

syd_thankful

My daughter’s gratitude turkey

As for me, I am thankful for many things on the list of 60 (link above), but the 4 things I am most thankful for are:

  1. I’m employed and I actually like my job (except when people yell at me for no good reason other than they’re lacking in self control and emotional intelligence, and that I think I deserve a lot more recognition for my efforts than I actually receive).
  2. My family.
  3. My postpartum depression (PPD) and my bullying experience during my lonely, friendless junior and high school days.
  4. My ability to be highly empathic.

Wow, my teenage and 20-something self would think I’ve lost my mind for saying I’m thankful for both my PPD and bullying experiences.  No, I haven’t lost my mind.  My PPD and bullying experiences allowed me to cultivate the EMPATHY that I’ve always possessed but didn’t always realize I had.  Because by experiencing these negative events firsthand, I can say that I TRULY understand.  I KNOW what it’s like to be excluded, gossiped about, and made fun of.  I KNOW what it’s like to be blindsided by a sudden darkness at a time that should be so happy (my first few months as a mother).

EmpathyWas I born with empathy?  I don’t know.  What I do know is that I have a ton of it.  That, and after all these years, I can finally say I possess a high EQ (emotional intelligence).  Emotional intelligence is something you need to have if you want to succeed at work.  And I sure know quite a number of people who could use a greater dose of it.  Because these very same people cause my blood pressure to go up needlessly.  I keep my behavior in check and move along.  Previously, a conflict would have set me back, preventing me from being productive and making me dwell on the situation for days….basically causing me a great deal of angst.

In my recent blog post, I mentioned the two Facebook groups I belong to, in which I try to provide online support to teens and moms on a daily basis.  So, I won’t go into more detail on them now.  I just wanted to mention, since the spirit of this blog post is about being thankful, that I am thankful I have the ability to see things from someone who has had PPD and from someone who has been bullied.  That is why I have become so passionate in these two areas.

What frustrates me are conversations I have about bullying and PPD that go around in perpetual circles, like the conversation I tried to have with someone yesterday.  I cannot get certain people to truly see what it is like to be bullied or to feel hopeless to the point of wanting to end the suffering….permanently.   For every scenario I come up with — whether it be a child who is being relentlessly pursued online and being verbally tormented or stalked in person and physically attacked — these individuals will come up with a “Well, I would tell my child to avoid such situations.”  Okay…..but you can only avoid cyberbullying and physical/verbal bullying in school to a certain and all too limited extent by “unplugging” (staying off social media, not have smart phones with texting capability) and avoiding bullies in school (what about being ambushed in the bathroom or merely walking down the hall to get from one class to the next or standing at your locker?).  When kids want to bully, they can be vicious and persistent…and they WILL find ways to get around your avoidance of them.  There are some real sociopathic kids out there (take the case of the 2 girls in Lakeland, Florida, who bullied Rebecca Sedwick to death this past September).   True, as a parent, you can arm your children with approaches to minimize the likelihood of your being a target of bullying.  You can get your child involved in activities and friends–not just classmates but friends from activities outside of school like through Church, Brownies, Girl Scouts, Cub Scouts,  Boy Scouts, sports, dance, gymnastics, music, martial arts — to give him/her the opportunity to make friends outside of school, give him/her a sense of camaraderie and fellowship with others who share similar interests, as well as build self confidence and identify what he/she likes to do and is good at doing.

ISL_I will always be there for you But if your child does in fact get bullied, then you sure as heck need to come up with ways to provide SUPPORT, SUPPORT, SUPPORT.  As a parent, that’s the FIRST thing you need to do.  Support would include things like thinking about strategies, finding resources/support groups (like Stand for the Silent), documenting incidents, and finding the right places to go to to report a situation and obtain results.  All too many school officials cover up incidents, turn a blind eye, and let bullying situations get out of hand just so they don’t have to deal with it.  There is absolutely NO EXCUSE for any of that.

So, for the people who don’t understand the impact bullying can have on a child and the impact depression can have on anyone–both young and old–and why all too many feel so desperate as to end their lives, I suggest you take the time to read some of the stories that get posted on social media and in the news.  Read about Rebecca Sedwick’s case and Grace McComas’ case, join the closed Facebook group Stand for the Silent and hear firsthand about the desperation, isolation, hopelessness that some teens feel.  All too many are at the end of their rope.  And it breaks my heart.  I want to do so much more for these young folks who have so many more years ahead of them to really learn about life, learn from their experiences, and really enjoy all that life has to offer — like the arts (music, literature, motion pictures, photography), sports, nature, traveling, and even helping and making a difference for others.  With the exception of sports (ha!), all these things make me see how I was given a gift of life and I sure as heck want to appreciate all the days I’ve got left.  I’ve got my bucket list, do you?

Unfortunately, not everyone is going to have the desire to pay it forward.  Their attitude is the following when it comes to situations like bullying and PPD:

Well, I suffered.  They can suffer much in the same way I suffered, without help or support, and feeling lonely, helpless and the end of my rope.  If I survived, they can too.  If they can’t, well then I guess we’ll call it fate.

Then, specifically for bullying:

It is, after all, a rite of passage….this thing called bullying.  Parents nowadays are overprotecting their children, and as a consequence, their children will be sheltered from valuable life experiences that are supposed to begin when they are young.  If they can’t deal with bullying, then how will they ever survive a day in the life of an adult?

gratitude

I would like to end this post with this as food for thought:

What are YOU thankful for?  Have you experienced PPD or some other life-changing event, and come out of it feeling thankful for the experience and determined to turn the event into a positive by helping others get through similar events?  Please think about it.  There are many people out there in need of support.  Would you have wanted to receive support when you were in your darkest moments?  If yes, then I think you’ll find, just as I’m finding, that paying it forward will give you a great amount of pleasure knowing you are making a difference for someone else.  In fact, you could be saving a life.

Thank you for reading this blog post.  And have a very Happy Thanksgiving!

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