A PPD/PPA Survivor’s Experience During the Coronavirus Outbreak

A brief note from Ivy:

Ever since the whole coronavirus thing started impacting us here in the U.S., I’ve been starting my emails and calls to friends, colleagues and clients with “I hope you are doing well.”

For those who read this post, I hope you ARE doing well.  The past couple of weeks have been a period of great uncertainty and adjustment for all of us.  I’ve been trying very hard to go with the flow and not to be overly anxious about what’s going on and the fear that I and members of my family would fall ill with the coronavirus.

It is normal to be anxious.  During this period of uncertainty and anxiety, remember to use your coping skills.  Breathe, listen to music, read a book, connect with people via Facetime, Zoom, Facebook, or any of the other numerous apps out there.  Even churches have been holding online services.

If you are struggling, visit this site to learn some things you can do to take care of your mental health in the face of uncertainty.  You may also call the national Disaster Distress Helpline ( 24/7) at 800-985-5990 for emotional support and crisis counseling if you are experiencing distress or other mental health concerns.  Calls are answered by trained counselors who will listen to your concerns, explore coping and other available supports, and offer referrals to community resources for follow-up care and support.

If you are a new or expectant mom or even a mom who has had a postpartum mood disorder in the past, you know you can rely on the support of Postpartum Support International volunteers and staff to support you if you are feeling anxious. PSI provides support to mothers and their families every day via 800-944-4773 or text 503-894-9453 (Eng) or 971-420-0294 (Español). Additionally, PSI’s free online support groups meet every Tuesday (and now every Thursday as well).  Meet other moms virtually, share your story, build a community and hang out with other moms! Find info on timings and register here.  Please also like the PSI Facebook page for daily updates, including changes to frequency of online support groups.

Stay healthy and safe.

Warmly,
Ivy

*******************

And here is my friend Stacy M’s experience during the coronavirus situation:

Tonight G said something that stopped me in my tracks. I’ve worried so much about regression with him.

At dinner, he announced:”You know I used to do this funny thing where I lined up all my animals on the steps all the time and it was so weird. I don’t know why I would do such a thing.”

I have tons of pictures on our iCloud when he would stim and line his dolls up in his own special way.  We never interfered with what he was doing and just let him run with it. We were always so careful to avoid knocking anything out of place.  We would leave his masterpieces around for days and days.

He has slowly outgrown this behavior. It’s been a while since he has lined things up. I didn’t even realize it….until now.

Now, with the whole coronavirus situation and with schools being closed, life has changed so much these past two weeks.  I have been worrying about what I would do if I had to step in for his teachers and do everything they’ve been doing that have helped him so much.

I was a broken soul his first two little years of life when I suffered terribly with severe postpartum depression (PPD) and postpartum anxiety (PPA).  I was crippled by PPD/PPA for some time.  It’s been 6 years since I felt the kind of despair that I felt when I suffered from PPD/PPA.  PPD/PPA paralyzed me so much that I was even afraid to hold my children (G has a twin sister) for the first year.

Then, when I noticed that G was showing signs of autism around 9 months old, the only way I knew I could help him was to secure as much help as I could with his autism. Even though I felt broken, as long as I had the right help for G, things would be fine.  I have always hated asking for help, but for my sake and for G’s sake, I had to let help in and let help heal us. Once I finally got my feet on the ground, I did better and so did G. We have been making progress and thriving ever since.

However, now with this new way of life of social distancing due to the coronavirus, I have been hit with a wave of feelings that brought me back to the days when I had PPD/PPA. Being a mother during these times is really tough. It’s not the kind of world I ever imagined my family and I would ever have to experience. I have done everything in my strength to be able to function well again.  But now, I’ve been experiencing waves of uncertainty from fear of the unknown, as I (along with everyone else around me) have never experienced what we are now experiencing.  The sudden turn of events requiring everyone to stop going to work, stop going to school, stop getting together with friends and relatives, and even stop going out unless we really had to caught everyone off-guard.  No one could prepare for any of this.

I’ve been having some tears build up for days now.  But I take deep breaths daily.  I’m taking one day at a time.  I have learned that I CAN teach my children from home. I have learned that I CAN manage this.  I HAVE been managing.

The fact that G could reflect on such behavior tonight made me feel so proud of myself and of him that we’ve come so far despite all the obstacles.

What I want to tell other new mothers and mothers to be is to not be afraid to ask for help and to rely on a support system.

It is important to communicate and put one foot in front of the other, one step and one day at a time.

It will all make sense again. It’s okay to be scared, it’s okay to cry right now, and it’s okay to talk about your fears and get them off your chest.

We may be quarantined but there are many online support groups that can help while we still need to maintain social distancing.

You are never alone.

– Stacy M

Diana, A True Musical Story

Happy Daylight Savings Day! Happy International Women’s Day! And happy longer & warmer days!  Looks like the groundhog was right…at least here in the NY metro area, spring is starting early this year!  I’m not going to speak of snow, specifically, for fear of jinxing myself.

I haven’t blogged in ages!  I’ve said that I have slowed down on blogging but will probably never fully stop, as I always have thoughts about postpartum depression (PPD).  I’ve blogged previously about television shows, movies and Broadway shows that delve into the topic of mental health and PPD, in particular. This time, it is the Broadway musical “Diana, A True Musical Story” that is motivating me to write today.  I saw the musical 2 nights ago in its first week of previews, and loved it.  Though, I do think the end needs some fine-tuning; I guess being in previews for the next few weeks leaves them some room to make adjustments, hopefully?  The music was written by Bon Jovi’s David Bryan who’d won a Tony award for “Memphis” and who I’m fairly sure will get a Tony nomination for Diana.  Another certain Tony nom is the one for best leading actress in a musical for Jeanna de Waal who is amazing as Princess Di….she captures all of Princess Di’s mannerisms, the way she carried herself, walked, etc.   There will no doubt be other Tony noms, including one for Judy Kaye for her portrayal of Queen Elizabeth, Best Costume Design of a Musical, Best Book of a Musical, Best Direction of a Musical, and of course Best Musical.

I am blogging about this show and about Diana because she posed as a beacon of light for those suffering from mental health issues.  During one of the scenes in which Diana had just given birth to Prince William, postpartum depression was mentioned.  Hey, a shout out about the condition that affects 1 out of 7 new moms!  I couldn’t contain myself and said out loud “Wow, they actually mentioned postpartum depression.” Good for you, Christopher Ashley and Joe DiPietro, for including this important experience of Princess Diana in this musical production!   I am grateful that this show was created to share with young and old: those who were around and when she was alive and loved her (like me) and those who weren’t born until after her death.   She wasn’t referred to the People’s Princess for nothing.  In her short life, she touched so many lives, most of whom had never even met her.

She was a woman ahead of her time, inspiring not only fashion trends, but through her courage of not holding back, not letting her situation crush her, and moving on with her life the way she wanted to live it….

Free of the yoke of being told what she could/couldn’t do because it was considered unbecoming of a princess and a woman.  While reciting her wedding vow to Prince Charles chose to omit the word “obey”….she was the first royal bride to do this, with Kate Middleton and Megan Markle following in her footsteps.  Additionally, she wore her infamous off-the-shoulder and body hugging black “Revenge Dress” (I won’t spoil what the show referred to this dress as, it will crack you up, I assure you) to a Vanity Fair dinner on June 29, 1994 because she knew Prince Charles was going to officially confess his affair with Camilla Parker Bowles there.

Free of the yoke of being tied to a man who didn’t love her.  She confronted Camilla Parker Bowles, the woman Prince Charles was having an affair with, at Camilla’s sister’s 40th birthday party.  During the BBC interview, she let the public know “There were three in the marriage, so it was a bit crowded.”  And soon after the interview in 1996, she again broke from religious/royal convention by getting divorced.

Free of the yoke of being Princess of Wales, speaking her mind, leading from her heart, and making the world fall in love with her.

  • She broke from the mold of royalty by being true to herself and honest and open about her feelings with the public.  Her interviews, biographies, recordings and book “Diana-Her True Story by Andrew Morton” (published in 1992) reveal her sense of humor, candor, and heart of gold. Diana was not afraid to tell the world that her life with Prince Charles was far from the fairytale-like marriage people believe it to be.  People in England and all over the world fell in love with her.

 

  • She was determined to fight the stigma of HIV and AIDS even though the Queen often voiced her displeasure about such efforts.  There are numerous pictures of her shaking hands and conversing with HIV/AIDS patients without any protective gear on.  She became involved with numerous charities in Africa that made a huge impact internationally with respect to the treatment of AIDS.

 

  • She was determined to fight the stigma of mental health issues like self harm, bulimia, and PPD.  Back in 1982 when Diana gave birth to Prince William, PPD was something that was never discussed with anyone. Her pregnancy was a difficult one.  She didn’t feel well throughout it, and things got worse after she had the baby. All the pressures of being a wife, a mother and the people’s princess were too overwhelming for her.  She worried constantly and struggled in silence.  She would cry and feel panicked whenever Prince Charles didn’t come home when he said he was coming home.  She kept her panic to herself.  The public noticed her getting thinner during her public appearances, which she explained was due to the fatigue from first-time motherhood. In her book “Diana-Her True Story” and her famous 1995 BBC interview with Martin Bashir, she finally opened up about her struggles with self harm, eating disorders, and postpartum depression (the root of all had to do with how unhappy she was with her marriage and how alone she felt).  Diana revealed that she had received very little support from the royal family when she was sick with PPD because they didn’t know what to do, because people back then (and even in many places and cases today) didn’t really know what PPD was.  The royal family went around saying that “Diana is unstable, Diana is mentally unbalanced” (these words were used in the musical).  Having such a negative label associated with her was unfortunate.  She wasn’t just a first-time mother trying to be the best mother for her child; she was also a young woman trying to adapt to her life as a princess. Between these pressures and the lack of emotional support / personal time and space, her toxic marriage, history of her own mother walking out of her life when she was a small child, shame from not being able to cope with everything, and lack of self esteem, it’s no wonder she suffered from PPD!  So many risk factors!

When no one listens to you, or you feel no one’s listening to you, all sorts of things start to happen. For instance you have so much pain inside yourself that you try and hurt yourself on the outside because you want help, but it’s the wrong help you’re asking for. People see it as crying wolf or attention-seeking, and they think because you’re in the media all the time that you’ve got ’enough attention.’ But I was actually crying out because I wanted to get better in order to go forward and continue my duty and my role as wife, mother, Princess of Wales. – from her BBC interview

She never got professional help because she didn’t really ask for it due to the shame she felt.  And yet she soldiered on….the People’s Princess to the very end of her life that was tragically cut short right after her 36th birthday on August 31, 1997.  I will never forget where I was (I was walking in an open market in Sydney, Australia) when I heard the tragic news.

Please go check it out if you were one of the many who fell in love with Princess Di that you were heartbroken for weeks after she died.  Please go check it out if your life hasn’t previously been touched by Princess Di and want to be inspired by the story of a woman way ahead of her time.  From the beginning of her marriage to Prince Charles to the end of it, she managed to become a powerful, independent woman despite all the royal restrictions that were in place.  In the end, she packed her bags and left, refusing to be stuck in a loveless marriage.

Dads Do Get PPD Too

I haven’t blogged about this important topic–of dads getting postpartum depression (PPD) too–since 2012, so it’s high time I do so now as I’m catching up during my stay-cation!

My previous posts are:
Fathers and Postpartum Depression
A Father’s Day Post: The Effect of PPD on the Dad
Shame on You, The Guardian, for Perpetuating Negative Notions on Mental Health Issues and Denigrating Men at the Same Time

In today’s post, I have a bunch of articles, and even a recent Today Show segment about PPD in dads, that I’d like to share.  PPD in dads is not a topic that you see much of because, after all, it’s the new mother whose body goes through a lot of physical changes before, during and after pregnancy.  After all, she’s the one who carries the child for months and after giving birth experiences roller coaster emotions, thanks to all the hormonal changes.  It’s bad enough that PPD is still so misunderstood (and what comes with lack of knowledge/understanding is stigma) in women, but the scoffing that men face when they find themselves suffering from PPD is even worse.

Men can and do experience depression after a child’s birth.  Risk factors include a personal history of depression, a wife that has PPD, a baby with health issues, colicky baby, first-time fatherhood and uncertainties due to inexperience, stress at work, etc. I personally know someone who experienced it briefly after the birth of his first daughter, and he was fortunately able to avoid it after his second daughter was born.

The Today Show that aired on August 3rd focused on the story of Dr. David Levine, a pediatrician who also happened to be a new father who suffered from PPD.  Dr. Levine, who talks about his experience with PPD, is accompanied by subject matter expert, Dr. Catherine Birndorf (psychiatrist and co-founder of The Motherhood Center) whom I’ve met previously at a Postpartum Support International conference, and Erika Cheng (assistant professor of pediatrics at Indiana University School of Medicine).

 

This is not, by the way, the first time the Today Show has focused on PPD in men.  On July 1, 2015, there was a very good article on it titled “Not just moms: postpartum depression affects 1 in 10 new fathers.” The article features the experience of Mark Williams, founder of  Fathers Reaching Out and Dads Matter UK.  The article also features information about PPD in fathers by subject matter expert Dr. Will Courtenay, who founded Postpartum Men.

On August 11, 2018, I spotted a CBC (Canada) article about PPD in men titled “New dads show signs of postpartum depression too, experts say.”

On May 19, 2017, I spotted a Deadspin article titled “A Q&A with Tony Reali About Postpartum Depression and Anxiety in Dads.” I know this article is a bit old….I have had this article up for the past 15 months!  I told you I had a lot of catching up to do!  Tony Reali is the host of ESPN’s Around the Horn.

 

In the Wake of the Recent Celebrity Suicides of Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain

I am shaken by the suicides of Anthony Bourdain and Kate Spade.  Very shaken.  Although I was never much of a fan of Kate Spade’s hand bags, shoes, clothing and jewelry, I was a pretty big fan of Anthony Bourdain’s for the simple fact that he brought very different people together around the world through an appreciation, respect, and curiosity of the vast array of cuisines and cultures.

These very successful individuals that you never once heard had any issues with depression or other mental health issues are suddenly taking their own lives.  I’ve seen comments that there are so many veteran suicides each day.  Don’t they matter?  Well, everyone matters……

Veterans matter.
Celebrities matter.
Mothers matter.
Fathers matter.
Young people matter.
Old people matter.

Why are we making such a big deal out of these celebrities?  For one, you see them on television, in newspapers, on the news, etc.  When you see them, do you ever see them depressed?  Unhappy?  Nope.  Do you ever hear about them being depressed?  Unhappy?  In Kate’s and Anthony’s situations, I do not believe there has ever been any mention of any struggles with depression.  I truly hope that the good that comes from these recent, high profile suicides that took place one after another–all in less than a week’s time–is a greater understanding that you can’t base the well-being of a person on looks, societal status, race, and religion alone.  People may have a history of mental illness and you would never know by looking at them.

Poor people have mental health issues.
Rich people have mental health issues.
Outgoing people have mental health issues.
Shy people have mental health issues.
Self confident people have mental health issues.
People lacking self confidence have mental health issues.
People of every race have mental health issues.
People of every religion have mental health issues.
[Don’t kid yourself if you believe the above statements are not true.]

The other thing I keep seeing is something that totally pisses me off.  People bad-mouthing the deceased with “Suicide is selfish.”  How the heck would you even know what they were going through?  They could have been battling so much pain for so many years, but how would you know?  Tell me, because I would love to know.  Are you like an alien and can take over the person’s body so you can know exactly how that person is feeling?  This reminds me of a previous post that I want to bring up again here.  All it takes is one day for you to know the extent of suffering that a person experiences.  I wish the haters and people passing judgment could walk in the shoes of a person battling bipolar disorder, PTSD, and depression.  After you go through that experience, then let’s talk.  Until then….SHUT. UP.

What’s truly behind the surface can only be determined if we sit down and spend time with them.  So, think about your circle of friends–not all thousand people that may be in your FB circle cuz, let’s face it, not everyone in that circle is truly a friend–and create a list of people you haven’t spoken to, heard from and/or seen in a while.  And arrange to meet them over a meal, and if not a meal, then coffee.  Or invite them over to your house.  Or visit them at their home.  Whatever you do should facilitate a conversation.  A real conversation.  A good ol’ fashioned in-person chat.  No social media.  No texting.  No emails.   The way it was in the good ol’ days before all this “social media” got in the way of forging true relationships.  That’s what we need more of.

Which brings me to this….as it seems society has degenerated thanks to social media that we now need people to create places like Sip of Hope, just to have a place where people can (truly) talk.

I saw a video on my Facebook feed, posted by a Facebook page called Well-Rounded Life a couple days ago about the brand new  coffee shop, Sip of Hope, that opened  at Logan Square, Chicago, last month during mental health awareness month.  Sip of Hope is run by Hope for the Day, founded by Jonny Boucher.  Here’s the link to the Chicago Tribune article that talks about what the coffee shop hopes to accomplish.  Hope for the Day is a Chicago not for profit that aims to raise awareness around suicide prevention and mental illness.  All proceeds will go to Hope for the Day.  It presents a unique approach of opening up a coffee shop for the purpose of allowing people to come in and talk, as well as eliminate stigma of mental health issues.  Baristas double as mental health aides.  There are pamphlets/flyers containing info on local mental health resources.

Good on ya, Jonny Boucher, for coming up with this idea and having it come true.  I sincerely hope this coffee shop stays open for a very long time, and other Sip of Hopes will open across the country until every major city has one!

Below is the video that was on CBS News before the grand opening:

 

The Recovery Letters

I just realized I haven’t posted for over a month, since the end of May!  Wow, where did June go?!  I posted on Facebook not long ago that I vowed to somehow make the most of the summer–my favorite season–because before you know it we will be in depressing winter again.

This is just a quick post on this sunny Saturday in July.  With only 13 days to go before the official release of the book The Recovery Letters, edited by James Withey and Olivia Sagan, I wanted to let you know that I had written a letter that is included in this anthology meant to give hope to those suffering from depression.  The book is published by Jessica Kingsley Publishers, and the book is available on a pre-sale basis via Amazon UK.

Recovery Letters

I am so honored to be included in this anthology.   Thank you, James, for giving me this wonderful opportunity to let my voice be included in this collection of letters written by folks far and wide….folks of different ages and stages in life that share a common bond: depression.

Depression is more common than you think.  Visit the WHO factsheet about depression to learn about it and to learn just how prevalent it really is.

Just to be clear, this is not a paid venture….my whole name is not even included in the book.  But I don’t care.

I want to help others, to make a difference in the lives of others.

I want to provide the kind of help I didn’t get when I was suffering and feeling all alone in what was happening to me.

I went into that experience not knowing what was wrong with me and why.

I went from not understanding what depression is like one day to the next day experiencing the following firsthand:   Insomnia, panic attacks, rapid weight loss, and not being able to control how I felt / *snap* out of it / pull myself out from the darkness that was engulfing me and dragging me into the pit of despair and feelings of hopelessness that I would never be myself again.

Knowing you’re not alone in a very isolating condition like depression can make a world of a difference for those who are suffering from it, which is why The Recovery Book will be good for so many people to read.

I am truly excited for James, as he has been collecting these letters since 2012.  I know what it’s like to dedicate many years toward a work of passion and to finally see it come to fruition.

Congrats, James!

Dear Evan Hansen: The Broadway Musical That Connects Us All

Congratulations to Dear Evan Hansen for its Tony Award nominations!  From the time I first heard Ben Platt sing “Waving Through A Window” weeks before the show even hit Broadway, I decided I had to see the show as soon as it came out.  So, see it I did during previews in November 2016.  AND IT WAS AMAZING!!!

And how a propos that the nomination occurred this past week during Mental Health Awareness Month, as the theme of the show is high school students struggling with social anxiety, drug addiction, depression and suicide.  Yes, it’s a pretty deep theme for a musical, but the cast, music and overall production are so amazing that the show has been sold out for weeks especially with the Tony Awards coming up on June 11th.  Thank you to the amazing cast, crew, director and producers for bringing such an important topic to the Broadway stage!

Ben Platt’s voice and acting were out-of-this-world-good.  No one else would be able to carry out the role of Evan the way he’s been carrying it out since the show hit the Broadway stage last November (oh, excuse me, since the show was first performed in Washington, DC from July 10, 2015-August 23, 2015 and then Off-Broadway from March 26, 2016-May 29, 2016).

It’s not surprising that Dear Evan Hansen has garnered 9 Tony nominations, and I would be extremely surprised–not to mention, disappointed–if it doesn’t win at least Best Actor in a Musical and Best Score for the amazing lyrics of Oscar-winning La La Land lyricists Benj Pasek and Justin Paul.  It was these lyrics in addition to the cast’s vocals that helped the musical’s cast recording to debut in the Billboard album chart’s top 10….the first time for a Broadway musical recording to do so since the 1960s.  Yes, you heard right!  Hamilton didn’t even debut in the Billboard album chart’s top 10 (it debuted at #12).  After the Dear Evan Hansen album was officially released on February 3, 2017,  it landed in the #8 spot on the Billboard 200 chart, and in so doing, it becomes the highest-charting musical since Lerner and Loewe’s Camelot debuted at #4 in 1961. Yes, you heard right!  It’s only one of 4 musicals to earn a top 10 Billboard spot in the past 50 years other than Hamilton, Book of Mormon, and the original 1969 production of Hair!

Here’s the video of the April 25, 2017 performance of “You Will Be Found” on the Today Show.  I cried from the moving lyrics while at the show, just as watching the intensity of the singers singing the emotional lyrics brings tears to my eyes each time I watch this video (I watched it about 5x in a row after I stumbled across it on the Internet this afternoon)…until I finally decided to write about this on my blog.  Here are the lyrics.

 

We need more shows like this (similar to Chicago Med) that show regular people–regular people like Evan or even like me (I had postpartum depression but most people around me didn’t know I even had the condition until I opened up months or even years later via my blog)–living around us that are struggling to cope with some sort of mental illness but you wouldn’t know it unless they shared that with you.  Mental illness is not just about some “nut” or “psycho” that’s dangerous to others…..nor is it something that you can control and “snap out of” at the blink of a finger or via spa treatment or buy buying yourself something nice.

We decrease stigma and shame by normalizing mental health issues. And why wouldn’t we?  After all, just to give you an example of how prevalent depression is, according to statistics, approximately 14.8 million adults–or 6.7% of Americans aged 18 and older–are affected by it in any given year.  Shows like Dear Evan Hansen brings much-needed awareness to mental health challenges that are very much a part of all too many people’s lives, people like Evan Hansen.  Like Evan, all too many people need help but go unnoticed.

Dear Evan Hansen connects us all.

If you live in the NY metro area, I recommend you see this show.  If you’re not in the NY metro area, I recommend you listen to the full Broadway recording on Youtube.

If you or someone you know is in crisis, please call the
National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255)
or contact the Crisis Text Line by texting TALK to 741-741

Here are some other important Suicide Prevention Resources:

Steve Bannon’s Ignorance on Mental Health

 *** This post may be triggering if you are suffering from postpartum depression (PPD) and are sensitive to negative news events***

Here I am, posting again….wow, it’s now 3x in one month.  I haven’t posted with such frequency in a long time.  Guess you can say the state of this country is heavy on my mind.  I had said in my last post that I wasn’t going to talk politics since this site is dedicated to maternal mental health.  I was planning to stick to that guideline.  But then I hit a snag in my plans, thanks to a post I read about Bannon, the individual that Trump has selected to be his chief strategist.  Bannon made a comment about mental health that triggered me so much it had me flashing back to the trigger that set me off on a 6-year journey to publish a book about my postpartum depression (PPD) experience.  What trigger is that?  Well, if you’ve been following my blog for some time and/or you read my author bio, you would know that Tom Cruise and his There’s no such thing as a chemical imbalance comment triggered me back in 2005.  But the outcome of the trigger was good, as I have my blog and book as the end result. And yes, I do thank TC in my Acknowledgments.

There’s nothing good about this trigger related to Bannon, though.  TC is just an ignorant actor. But Bannon is an ignorant white supremacist who will have a role in the White House and will have far more negative consequences than TC ever had.  Bannon made a statement that the cure for mental illness is to spank your children more.  Excuse me?  What.The.Fuck. (oops, forgot to use $ or other symbol to fill in for the “u” for the very first time…..there’s a first time for everything, as they say).  I’ve truly had it with this whole election.  I’ve had it with all the hatred, misogyny and bigotry.  With the cheeto about to become our President and the alt right using him as a tool to ensure there are at least 4 years of revenge for the 8 years they had to suffer under President Obama, they have populated the leadership team with known racists (Bannon, Sessions, Flynn) and ensuring that racism becomes the new normal.  My passion for matters related to racism stems from my being bullied as a child for my race.  But I’m not going to digress here (even though anti-bullying is my other passion)……

Note: If you’re a Trump follower trolling this blog post and thinking I’m bullying Bannon or Trump, then think again.  Bullying is DIRECT harassment to them personally.  I’m exerting my 1st amendment right voicing my thoughts on my own blog.  Thank you very much.

<directing myself back on track….>

Bannon, just like I’ve been wishing to tell Tom Cruise in person, I wish I could tell YOU in person, if you’ve never been through mental illness yourself, then:
Shut the f*ck up.  
Shut.Your.Ignorant.Mouth.Up.  

And get educated about mental illness and how it REALLY works.  It’s not mind over matter, you dimwit.  Take a few minutes to read a blog post that may help you see the light when it comes to PPD.  There are plenty of articles from health organizations and blog posts on the Internet for you to learn the TRUTH behind mental illness.  But I’m pretty sure you won’t bother to spend a second to read anything because you think you know it all, don’t you.

Here’s where, if I could be granted 3 genie wishes, one of them would be to make all haters/bigots switch places with the ones being hated and the ones who keep insisting that mental illness is mind over matter to switch places with those who are battling a mental illness (e.g., depression, PTSD, bipolar disorder, etc.).  You will learn in an instant that the logic you’ve been upholding is COMPLETELY WRONG.  See my past post on this titled “All It Takes Is One Day.”  One day to experience a mental illness yourself, firsthand……THAT’S ALL IT TAKES to snap you to reality and stop living in a world based on assumptions (that only make a$$es out of you).

And speaking of backwards, as women, we should not let ourselves be dragged backwards when it comes to our rights. We must stand up for ourselves and for each other.  We must work harder than ever to support organizations that will help us stay on track when it comes to mental health and women’s rights, especially during the time that women are most vulnerable–i.e., before, during and after childbirth.  Please join me in doing this!

If you’re a mom suffering from PPD right now, please be comforted in knowing that there are plenty of people in this country and around the world who care enough to make it a goal to help moms like you.  Please reach out to me, reach out to others with blogs, Facebook pages….we will help you get through this.

You WILL get through this.  I got through it stronger than ever before, and so can you!

Peace to you.