Why Screening of Postpartum Moms is Important and Who Can and Should Do the Screening

Today’s post was inspired by a March 19, 2018 NPR article by April Dembosky titled “Lawmakers Weigh Pros and Cons of Mandatory Screening for Postpartum Depression,” as well as a June 2018 Romper article by Karen Fratti titled “Moms Should be Screened for Postpartum Depression in the ER, New Study Suggests, & It Makes Perfect Sense,” a June 30, 2018 News Medical article titled “Screening mothers for PPD in emergency setting,” and a June 29, 2018 Austin360 article by Nicole Villalpando titled “Who should be screening moms for postpartum depression? More doctors now can.

Screening moms for postpartum depression (PPD) serves multiple purposes.  Screening will help ensure moms get the help they need and avoid suffering unnecessarily.  In case you weren’t aware, screening educates women on what PPD is, why it happens and just how common it is (1 in 7 new moms experience it), and helps them avoid what I and so many other mothers have gone through (PPD makes you feel alone, like you’re losing your mind and will never return to your previous self).  It will ensure fewer moms will ultimately fall through the cracks.  It will ensure fewer tragedies involving mothers and their babies.  And I’ve said this many times before, but a mother who is not well cannot care for her baby the way a healthy mother can.  This is pure logic.  Unfortunately, logic takes a back seat because our capitalist society places more priority on what benefits the pocket over what benefits the people’s well-being.

So…..question is WHO should screen new moms for PPD?

Her OB/GYN?  This should be a given, period, hands down, no questions asked!  In May 2018 the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommended that, in addition to the standard 6-week postpartum visit, OB/GYNs perform a follow-up visit within the first three weeks postpartum.  This new recommendation is due to the fact that symptoms of PPD often begin before the 6-week appointment.   See second half of my blog post on the issues many OB/GYNs are faced with in terms of screening.

Her baby’s pediatrician (but here the patient is the baby, not the mother)?  The American Academy of Pediatrics (click here and here) recommends doctors screen mothers for PPD when they bring their newborns in for wellness visits, since they occur numerous times in the baby’s first year; whereas, the mother only gets the one wellness check at postpartum week six.  Pediatricians who realize that the baby’s development can be negatively impacted when the mother is ill with PPD will try to screen the mom for PPD.  Problem is, most pediatricians as far as I’m aware are not prepared to screen and refer mothers since the mother is not a patient.

An ER physician?  While you will no doubt raise your eyebrows, doctors like Dr. Lenore Jarvis, an emergency medicine specialist with the Children’s National Emergency Department at United Medical Center in Washington, DC, have been seeing moms bring their babies to the ER, and it turns out the baby is fine but it’s the mother who is highly anxious and feeling overwhelmed.  In these cases, it’s logical to try to determine if it’s the mother who needs help.  In fact, Dr. Jarvis and several colleagues conducted a research study with several colleagues on screening moms for PPD in an ER setting.  A Eureka Alert release dated June 29, 2018 explains the results of the research study. Moms who participated were screened using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale supplemented by other questions.  The great thing about the research study is that, when moms scored positive for PPD, they received information about PPD and were offered–or if they had a strong positive score from screening, they were required to have–a consultation with a social worker.  Additionally, the researchers followed up with mothers who screened positive one month later to see how they were doing.  This is akin to case management programs we have in place when patients check out of hospitals (I explain all this in my post below). Now THIS is the way it SHOULD be!

Dr. Jarvis refers to the ER as a “safety net  for people who are not routinely accessing regular checkups for themselves and their children. If a mother is having an acute crisis in the middle of the night and feeling anxious and depressed, they often come to the emergency department for help.”  Because American policymakers have been so resistant to instituting policies that would require insurance companies to work with doctors to ensure PPD is caught early through screening and subsequent referrals–researchers/subject matter experts on PPD are left to make recommendations for what Dr. Jarvis referred to as a “safety net” approach of having emergency rooms screen for PPD when moms come in either for their babies (for colic, fevers, etc.) or even for themselves (symptoms of a postpartum mood disorder).

While I agree we need to cover all bases and try to screen a new mother wherever and whenever possible, why do we even need to resort to waiting until a mom comes into the ER to screen them?  Why do we have to have such a safety-net, fall-back, beats-nothing-at-all, better-late-than-never approach in the first place?  Answer:  our society continues to place too much priority on conception and childbirth but once the baby is born, everyone forgets the mother.  Once the baby is born, the mother’s health falls by the wayside.  I’ve blogged about this before, but the attention from that point on will be on the baby from visitors who coo at the baby and treat the mother as invisible.  Same thing with doctor visits; the mother only gets one postpartum wellness check at 6 weeks.  That’s it.  It’s like the mother ceases to exist.  Whereas, other cultures have customs to honor and mother the mother (click here and here for past posts).  The birth of the baby is synonymous in these cultures with the birth of the new mother and they are honored for bringing new life into the world.  This, my friends, is why maternal mental health advocacy is so important.  Until American policymakers institute policies to demonstrate the importance of mothers and their health, we advocates must continue to act as “squeaky wheels to get the grease.”

The following section is an excerpt from my book.

New mothers, especially the ones at high risk for PPD, should be screened during their six-week postpartum visit, provided she doesn’t complain about symptoms up to that point. If she is symptomatic before the six-week visit, she should be screened right then. If the six-week screen doesn’t indicate PPD, she should be assessed once more at the twelve-week point—or when she weans or when her period returns, whichever comes first, since these events can trigger PPD in some women.

The following—in addition to screening tools like the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale or Cheryl Beck’s Postpartum Depression Screening Scale—should be asked at the six-week follow-up visit with the OB/GYN, which can help diagnose PPD:

  1. Have you been feeling any of the following for the past two weeks?
  • Persistent and mostly inexplicable sadness/tearfulness and feeling empty inside
  • Loss of interest/pleasure in hobbies/activities you once enjoyed; inability to laugh
  • Overall impaired functioning
  • Sleep difficulties (either insomnia or sleeping too much)
  • Weight loss (usually fairly quick) associated with a decrease in appetite
  • Weight gain associated with an increase in appetite
  • Excessive anxiety about the baby
  • Restlessness/irritability
  • Detachment from and inability to bond with the baby
  • Difficulty thinking, concentrating or making decisions
  • Feelings of guilt, inadequacy, failure and/or worthlessness
  • Urge to run away
  • Onset of panic attacks
  • Sense of despair and/or hopelessness leading to thoughts of death/suicide
  1. How have you been feeling physically and emotionally?
  2. Are you feeling particularly stressed, and, if so, is it due to a major change you are experiencing, such as marital problems, death of a loved one, financial problems, a recent move, or a job change?
  3. How do you feel about the baby? Are your feelings in line with your expectations of how you’d feel about the baby?
  4. Do you feel you have adequate emotional and practical support from your partner? Do you have any relatives or any other help, like a doula, to help you with the baby during the day?
  5. Are you breast-feeding and, if so, how is it going?
  6. How do you feel the labor and delivery went? Do you feel you experienced any sort of trauma during the delivery?
  7. Do you feel your childbirth and motherhood experience are meeting your expectations?
  8. Do you feel particularly anxious about your baby’s health (colic, SIDS)?
  9. How is your appetite?
  10. How are you sleeping? Have you been able to get at least four, if not five, hours of sleep a night?
  11. Have you had any recurring thoughts/images that are disturbing?
  12. How have you been adapting to motherhood, in general?
  13. Have you returned, or will you return, to work?

I believe these types of questions should be incorporated by all OB/GYNs throughout the country. This all theoretically sounds good and fine, but in most cases, OB/GYNs are not prepared to implement. Why not? At the very least, it would require training on perinatal mood disorders (recognition of symptoms and treatment), as well as ability to provide the right referrals as needed.

This last paragraph from my book excerpt remains true to this day.  Sad because I published my book in 2011.  Seven years later, things have not really changed.

California’s screening bill, AB 2193, has yet to pass the Senate and get signed into law.  Once passed, it would be an exciting development for mothers, as it doesn’t just require screening for PPD.  It requires health insurance companies to set up case management programs (same way my mother was assigned a case manager each time she had to stay overnight at a hospital to ensure she had a plan in place to address the issues that landed her in the hospital–i.e., physical therapy in a rehab center, visiting nurse to change her bandaging, etc.) to help connect moms who screen positive for PPD with a mental health practitioner.

Case management is set up to ensure there is a treatment/referral plan in place.  I sincerely hope that this means health insurance companies are prepared and able to carry out the new requirements.   And I sincerely hope that California will lead the way for other states to follow suit in setting up similar screening bills that will actually require health insurance companies to set up case management programs.

It goes without saying that screening moms for PPD serves no purpose if you can’t help those who test positive for PPD.  So far, as the first state that put mandatory screening in place, New Jersey has not had any reason to be excited ever since its initial groundbreaking “first-state-to-mandate-screening” announcement.  New Jersey, as well as 3 other states— Illinois, Massachusetts, and West Virginia — have tried mandated screening, and it did not result in more women getting treatment, according to a study published in Psychiatric Services in 2015.

A whopping 78% of those who screen positive don’t end up getting mental health treatment per a 2015 research review published in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology.  Why have women in these states with mandatory screening not been getting treatment?  Well, for starters:

  1. Some obstetricians and pediatricians are afraid to screen for PPD because they are not equipped to refer.  But why is that?   Why is it hard for them to all rely on the resources available via Postpartum Support International?  Its website lists resources in every state.  And many states have already formed, or are in the process of forming, chapters to focus on state-specific efforts at advocacy, training, and other improvements.
  2. The resources to whom doctors (obstetricians, pediatricians, general practitioners, etc.) can refer mothers are limited, especially in more rural areas.  And in more rural areas, it’s harder to find mental health practitioners trained in prescribing meds to pregnant/breastfeeding women, let alone trained in treating moms with PPD.
  3. All too many mental health practitioners don’t take the woman’s insurance or there are significant limitations from an insurance coverage perspective.
  4. There’s a very long wait (several months) to see most mental health practitioners, especially for the first time….a woman in the throes of PPD can’t afford to–both literally (from a cost perspective) and figuratively (from a life & death perspective).
  5. There’s little incentive financially, thanks to insurance companies’ lack of adequate coverage for doctors who do such screening…..in my opinion, screening should be done at the standard 6-week postpartum checkup and therefore covered as part of that checkup.

Attention, American policymakers….our mothers are worth it.  I mean, we make such a big stink about fetuses and unborn babies in this country, let’s start thinking bigger picture, shall we?  Without mothers, there would be no babies to conceive and bring into this world.  Let’s start treating mothers less like second-class citizens and more like human beings who deserve to be able to give birth to and care for their babies without getting sick with PPD and possibly dying in the process!

 

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Please Throw Me a Postpartum Party Instead of a Baby Shower, Thanks

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A truly useful baby shower gift after the baby’s arrival is having relatives, friends, neighbors, etc. chip in funds for hired help [like a postpartum doula] for the first one to two months.

Additionally, as this article suggests, the shower that is thrown should entail a list of family/friends who will help (with watching the baby so the new mom can get some much-needed alone time/rest/shower, picking up groceries, cooking, dishes, laundry, cleaning, etc.) during the first 6 weeks postpartum.  This could include a meal plan via http://www.mealtrain.com deliveries or doing take-out and dropping the food off.

Perhaps if we focused more on ensuring new mothers have the support they need after the new baby arrives, there would be fewer instances of postpartum mood disorders!

 

Join Elly Taylor of Becoming Us on her U.S. tour of training sessions for parents and professionals!

My friend, Elly Taylor, is an Australian relationship counselor, author of the book Becoming Us, and founder of an organization of the same name, which she created to teach professionals and support mothers and their partners.  Both the book and organization’s mission is to help the mother and partner navigate the peaks and valleys of the parenting journey via 8 essential steps that Becoming Us as “map, compass and travel guide all in one.”

Elly is here in the states for her “Seed Planting” workshop tour in Chicago, Beverly (MA), Providence (RI), New York City, Houston and Los Angeles.  For the complete schedule and how to register, click here.

At Darling Harbour, Sydney (2014)

Elly and I have a bunch of things in common.  We are both postpartum depression (PPD) survivors and book authors (though hers is award winning).  We were both blindsided by PPD and the challenges of parenting.  We are both members of Postpartum Support International.  Elly loves NYC (where I’ve spent the last 29 years working) as much as if not more than I love Sydney (where she lives).  She is fortunate enough to be out here in NYC each year for the past 3 years on Becoming Us-related reasons; whereas, I’ve been back to Sydney 3x in the past 21 years (I so wish I could return more often!).  I look forward to seeing Elly during her stay in NYC!

Professionals:

Sign up for Elly’s 2-hour interactive workshop that will teach you key tools to prepare/support expectant/new parent couples to anticipate/cope with the changes–and stay connected through the challenges that come with–early parenthood. You’ll come away with ways for parents to nurture themselves and their partners so the whole family can thrive.  This workshop is designed for couple and family therapists, birth professionals, infant or child mental health professionals, and any others who work with expecting, new or not so new parents.

The transition to parenthood is a major one that consists of numerous transitions.  The training will teach you what the transitions are and how they can negatively impact mothers and their families. You’ll learn how to plant Becoming Us “seeds” that reduce risk for the most common parenthood problems including perinatal mental health issues and relationship distress. Finally, you’ll discover the groundbreaking Becoming Us approach to parenthood and how you can apply the model to your work with parents at any stage of their family life cycle.

Parents:

Sign up for Elly’s 1-hour interactive workshop that will teach you about the transitions that parents normally go through in their first years of family, the steps to navigate each of these transitions and staying connected through the challenges that come with early parenthood. You’ll come away knowing how to nurture yourselves while growing a family that thrives.

 

 

The Robin Study is Looking for New Mothers to Participate in a Research Study

The Robin Study is a research study evaluating an investigational oral medication in women with postpartum depression (PPD).  An investigational medication is a study drug that will be tested during a study to see if it is safe and effective for a specific condition and/or group of people.

To be eligible for the study, you must:
  • Be 18 to 45 years of age
  • Have given birth within the last 6 months
  • Feel any of these symptoms associated with PPD for 2 weeks or longer:  insomnia, crying/sadness, lack of appetite, sudden weight loss, hopelessness, lack of interest in baby, loss of interest in things you used to enjoy, intrusive/disturbing thoughts
  • Have symptoms that began no earlier than the third trimester and no later than the first four weeks following delivery (I know that many mothers don’t develop PPD until 6 weeks or later, but this is a specific requirement for this particular research study)

If you qualify and decide to participate:

  • Your PPD symptoms will be continually monitored by qualified study staff (nurses and clinicians), under the guidance of the study doctor.
  • You will receive study-related medical care and the assigned study drug at no cost.
  • You will be required to take the assigned study drug at home every night for 14 days. You’ll have nightly phone calls with the study coordinator and will come into the study site three times while on the medication and two times as follow-up. Your total participation will last about 76 days.
  • Transportation may be provided for those who require assistance.

To learn more about the study, review frequently asked questions, and see if/how you may qualify, please visit www.TheRobinStudy.com, call (844) 901-0101 to speak with a study representative, or fill out the contact form and a study representative will follow up with you.

Recent PPD Successes and Failures in the Media

I went from blogging once in two months to 8 times so far this month!  With Maternal Mental Health Month a little less than a week away, a lot of fundraising, training and public awareness events are being prepped to happen throughout May.  Another reason to love this time of year….hello spring!

Okay, so the title of my post is “Recent PPD Successes and Failures in the Media.”  There were 2 things in the media that caught my attention on my Facebook feed today that motivated me to blog once again. One is a success and one is a failure.  If you’ve been following my blog for some time, you would know that one of my favorite things to blog about are successful and failed attempts at depicting new mothers suffering from a mood disorder in the media, like my recent post about “Black-ish.”

Let’s start with the SUCCESS……
On this morning’s Megyn Kelly TODAY a postpartum mood and anxiety disorder (PMAD) survivor, Ashley Abeles, shared her experience.  The segment also included brief appearances by Dr. Catherine Birndorf and Paige Bellembaum who are the Medical Director and Program Director, respectively, of The Motherhood Center of New York. The Motherhood Center provides support services for new/expectant moms and treatment for PMADs. I met these ladies from the Motherhood Center at previous Postpartum Support International conferences.  If you missed the show, you can watch it here.  We need more moms sharing their PMAD experiences on shows like this!  Experiences kind of like my own that, as her husband explains, isn’t “headline-grabbing” material involving the tragic death of the mother and/or baby.  Because guess what, the vast majority of PMADs experienced by new mothers are NOT headline-grabbing material.  They’re mothers suffering from anxiety, panic attacks, insomnia, weight loss and/or intrusive/obsessive thoughts who need medication and/or therapy to recover.  Yes, severe postpartum depression (PPD) can cause a mother to feel so depressed that she just wants to disappear or her baby would be better off without her since she can’t feel joyous like a new mother should, but postpartum psychosis is too-often confused with and lumped under PPD (as a catch-all term) by both the general public and doctors alike.  Yes, doctors!  Also, PPD is not the same as the baby blues and even today, doctors still mix up the two!  We’ve come a long way since I had PPD when it comes to information in the news, in publications, on the Internet and in social media.  But we still have a LONG way to go.

And here’s the FAILURE……
The movie “Tully” starring Charlize Theron.  A Motherly post by Diana Spalding titled “We’ve seen Tully– and we’ve got some real concerns” it seems yet another movie director/producer has failed to do their homework about PPD before coming up with the screenplay and releasing it.  What every movie director/producer or TV show director/producer needs to do before even contemplating a movie or TV show about PPD is consult with Postpartum Support International.  This organization is the leading authority on maternal mental health matters and should ALWAYS be consulted to ensure the right information is incorporated into the movie/show plot.  “Tully” attributes the bizarre experiences of Tully (i.e., hallucinations she has of Marlo, frantic baking and cleaning late into the night, impulsive behavior that leads to her car crash, suicidal ideation) to PPD.  However, her behavior is actually attributable to postpartum psychosis, hence this movie spreads misinformation about what PPD really is.  Her talk of suicide is brushed off by her husband, which I can see happening in the real world when loved ones fail to “get it” and ignore the mother’s serious need for help.  While this is a movie and movies don’t necessarily have to educate–after all, this is not a documentary–it should at least get terms right (postpartum psychosis, NOT PPD!)  and it should try to mention at some point that yes, the new mother who’s obviously not well and diagnosed, albeit incorrectly, with PPD needs help!  Maybe put some kind of disclaimer at the beginning or end of the movie like you sometimes see at the beginning or end of a TV show.  Something along the lines of:

“Approximately one out of seven new mothers suffers from a postpartum mood disorder.  If you are a new mother that is experiencing any of the following symptoms: insomnia, crying/sadness for more than 2 weeks, lack of appetite, sudden weight loss, rage, hopelessness, lack of interest in the baby, loss of interest in things you used to enjoy, thoughts of harming the baby or yourself, please know that you are not alone, what you are experiencing is not your fault, and you will recover if you get the right treatment.  Contact Postpartum Support International at 800-944-4773 or visit http://www.postpartum.net

“Mother May I?” – An Important Documentary About Childbirth Trauma

A couple of days ago, a link to the Kickstarter project for the documentary “Mother May I” popped up on my Facebook feed, and it instantly caught my eye (and yes, I am one of the many backers and sincerely hope they meet their financial goal in 30 days, so please consider backing too….even $10 would help!).  Why did it catch my eye?  Because I had a traumatic childbirth experience that was the beginning of an agonizing postpartum depression (PPD) journey.  I didn’t have the awareness needed for me to advocate for myself.  There were no patient advocates anywhere along my PPD journey.  I didn’t have anyone to talk to about my experience.  I didn’t have a means of validating what I experienced.  I was in the dark.  I had to learn the hard way.  This is why I blog, why I wrote my book, and why I look for ways to help others and to try to get the word out and raise awareness so fewer mothers will be blindsided the way I was.

About one-third of new mothers describe their childbirth experiences as traumatic, but you hardly ever hear about negative experiences because everyone wants to be like “everyone else” and happily announce that “mother and baby are doing well.”  No one wants to admit to having a negative childbirth experience, just like no one wants to hear about a negative childbirth experience.  And that is why everyone thinks childbirth experiences aren’t that big a deal.

I had previously blogged about negative childbirth experiences via my blog post titled “Forget the Myths, Here are the Realities of Pregnancy, Childbirth and Postpartum Experiences.” It was one of my first blog posts.   The difference between my traumatic childbirth experience and the ones that are the focus of this film is that the ones in the film, like the one experienced by Caroline Malatesta, involve obstetric assault that resulted in both physical and emotional harm to the mother.  That is much, much worse than what I experienced.

What has been completed thus far is 20 hours of footage of interviews of more than 15 experts (including a birth doula, a labor & delivery nurse and psychologist who specializes in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and survivors of birth trauma.  My plan is to reach out to the Birth Monopoly Foundation folks behind this documentary–including Caroline Malatesta, President, whose own birth trauma story is the impetus behind and featured in this film–and make sure they include the connection between negative childbirth experiences and maternal mental health disorders like PPD.

If you’ve been following my blog for some time, you know that passion for public awareness is one of my focal points.  I am particularly excited to see that funds from the Kickstarter project will help fund online campaigns to provide free information about birth trauma, resources, and legal rights. It will also help fund college outreach initiatives to help get the film (plus guided discussion) into 1,000 college classrooms around the country.  I believe there is no better time to present such information to teens than in colleges.   Colleges are a great way to reach numerous young people at once.  Speaking of which, I had envisioned doing a book reading of my book at my alma mater when it first came out, but I didn’t get very far.  My school is an all-women’s school and what better place to reach so many women at once about PPD!  But my idea didn’t get much interest.  Perhaps I wasn’t reaching out to the right people.   Perhaps I will try again there….and in other colleges as well.

To follow Birth Monopoly on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/birthmonopoly 

 

Journey of a PPD Survivor – Q/A Series – #2

Welcome to the second of my Journey of a PPD Survivor Series!

Laura Winters, LCSW, whom I’ve had the pleasure of knowing since we met at this year’s Postpartum Support International conference in Philadelphia, is a therapist specializing in infertility and prenatal/postpartum stress.  We are both members of the recently-established PSI-New Jersey chapter.  Laura is passionate about helping women on their journeys through motherhood, offering individual and group support.  Her practice, Postpartum Health & Harmony, is located in Chatham and Mountain Lakes, NJ.  For more information or to contact Laura, please visit www.postpartumhh.com.

Thank you, Laura, for taking the time to provide my blog readers some insight into your journey as a PPD survivor!

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Question 1:
Can you please describe your journey to becoming a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and what motivated your passion to help women with infertility issues (which I experienced) and mothers suffering from a perinatal mood disorder? How long have you been helping women experiencing infertility and perinatal mood disorder?

 When I was considering careers, I wasn’t totally sure what I wanted to do, but I knew that I wanted a career that would enable me to make a difference in people’s lives.   Social work was suggested to me and it was a perfect fit!  I started out my career working with children and teens and I really enjoyed helping them through various challenges.  In 2007, I started working in private practice, primarily focusing on families.  It wasn’t until about 2011 that I first started seeing some women who were struggling with perinatal mood disorders.  At that time, it wasn’t a specialty of mine, so I only saw a few new mothers.

In 2013, I became a mother and had an entirely new appreciation for parenthood.  It was incredibly difficult in ways I never imagined.  Breastfeeding was not going well, which caused me a lot of anxiety, sadness, and added to my exhaustion.  My husband and I both felt more like roommates and our relationship was strained.  This experience inspired me to make some career changes, most notably acquiring more advanced training in perinatal mood disorders and developing this specialty in my practice.

As I began to work with more pregnant and postpartum moms, I also started getting referrals for women experiencing infertility and postpartum moms who had gone through fertility treatments.  Once again, I felt a need to learn more and was interested in adding this focus to my practice.  I see these times in women’s lives, when you’re trying to conceive or newly postpartum, as being so precious and yet such a vulnerable period.  For the most part, everyone assumes that they will get pregnant easily and that motherhood will be challenging but amazing.  When things don’t go as planned, it can completely turn your world upside down and have you questioning everything about your life.  My personal experience definitely fueled my passion for supporting moms as well as couples trying to conceive.

 

Question 2:
In your practice, have you seen a correlation between infertility and a perinatal mood disorder? Do you treat mothers who you’d also seen while they were struggling with infertility issues and ended up suffering from a perinatal mood disorder?  Have you treated women suffering from infertility issues who ended up not suffering from a perinatal mood disorder?

 Infertility treatment is a risk factor for a perinatal mood disorder and I do see this correlation in my practice, though not across the board.  There are so many factors that influence whether a mother will develop a perinatal mood disorder.  I’ve seen women who have been through infertility treatment and did not end up experiencing any perinatal mood disorders.  Support and early intervention are very helpful in protecting a mom’s mental health.

  

Question 3:
Can you provide an overview of the services you provide? I see that you help patients in person, online, and even in a support group setting. Do you find one way of seeing your patients is more helpful? 

 I offer individual, couples, and group counseling.  I see almost all of my clients in person.  I offer online and phone sessions for times when clients may not be able to come to the office, such as not having child care available or in the first few weeks after childbirth.  Online and phone sessions are a great way of continuing sessions when life gets in the way.  The support group is open, meaning that you don’t have to register and can come as often as you need.  The moms that come to the group tend to be looking for different support than those who come for individual counseling.  The group moms are often looking to connect more with other moms going through similar experiences.

  

Question 4:
In your practice, what kinds of treatments for postpartum depression do you recommend?

In addition to therapy, I will recommend medication for those that are open to it or who have tried other things and are still struggling.  I also encourage my clients to try to incorporate exercise and a healthy diet into their routine.  For clients that are interested, I may recommend meditation or teach them an acupressure technique called Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT).

 

Question 5:
Have any medical healthcare practitioners–like IVF doctors, general practitioners, OB/GYNs or pediatricians–ever refer their patients to you?

 Yes, medical healthcare practitioners are great referral sources.  I definitely get more referrals from those healthcare professionals who take the time to talk to their patients about mental health.

 

Question 6:
What do you think medical health practitioners who come in contact with new mothers, like OB/GYNs, GPs and pediatricians, can do to help prevent, detect and treat perinatal mood disorders?

I would encourage medical health practitioners to take time to talk to moms about mental health.  Ask them about their mood and stress level.  Look their patients in the eyes and ask them how they are really doing.  Normalize how challenging being a mother is.  Making comments such as “motherhood is tough” or “you have a lot on your plate now” can go a long way in helping a mother feel comfortable to open up to you.  And having referral sources on hand when their patients need more support is extremely important.  Don’t leave it up to a new mom to have to find help herself.

 

Question 7:
Is there one key piece of advice you would offer to an expecting or new mom?

For expecting moms, I would tell them to make a postpartum plan that outlines things such as who they can count on for specific types of support (baby/childcare, cooking, advice, etc), how they will protect their sleep, and where they can turn if they need support.  For new moms, I would advise them to take breaks, ask for and accept help, and know that challenges come in phases but do eventually end.

 

Question 8:
What would you want to say to women currently suffering with a postpartum mood disorder?

This is the most common complication of childbirth and not an indication of who you are as a mother.  There is a lot of support available out there including counseling, support groups, and other moms who have been there and are happy to offer encouraging words.  You will feel better once you get the support that’s right for you.  Other moms have recovered and you will too.

 

Question 9:
What advice would you offer to friends/family members of a woman who is currently suffering with a postpartum mood disorder?

Reach out to her often – call, text, stop over.  Be there for her when she’s ready to talk.  Try to listen and validate her feelings.  Consider what support you can offer her—including cooked meals, childcare, cleaning, keeping her company—and rather than asking if she wants that help, tell her that this is how you’d like to help.  Tell her when you’re available to provide that support and then let her decide when you can come over.  Most moms will turn down help initially, but when you are very specific with what you can do and when you can do it, it’s harder to turn that down.  Also, it may help you better understand what she’s going through by researching information on perinatal mood and anxiety disorders.

 

Question 10:
What do you see as the biggest challenge in helping a mother recover from a postpartum mood disorder?

Lack of support and lack of insurance coverage are big obstacles.  It’s hard enough finding a therapist or psychiatrist, let alone when you have an infant and aren’t feeling like yourself.  Whether you have insurance coverage or not can help or hinder the process.   I find that the more support a mother has around her (people who can help with certain tasks and give her breaks), the easier recovery is.  It’s really challenging when you don’t have enough support at home and are expected to do a lot of the childcare and household tasks.  It doesn’t allow enough time for moms to tend to their needs.