Free Screening of Not Carol and Panel Discussion – Scotch Plains, NJ on May 29, 2019

If you live in New Jersey, please consider attending this screening of Not Carol, a feature-length documentary about the Carol Coronado case from 2014.  I’d blogged about it here and here.  And in searching for her current status just now (I was hoping there’d be news that would be more positive than that she was spending the rest of her life in prison without parole), I found this article featuring Joy Burkhard of 2020Mom  and her advocacy for Carol and other moms.  Carol’s case is another example of a tragic loss resulting from a postpartum mood disorder, in this case postpartum psychosis.

What:  Free Screening of Not Carol

Why:  Learn about postpartum depression (PPD), its symptoms and how to support mothers (and even fathers) suffering from it.  Public awareness initiatives like this one can help reduce stigma and ensure mothers suffering from a postpartum mood disorder, like PPD or postpartum psychosis, get the help they need.  We must ensure future cases like Carol’s will never happen again.  Note: this screening is not just intended for doctors/psychiatrists/social workers that work with new moms.  You can be a survivor, advocate, or simply a concerned citizen who may or may not know someone in your life that has suffered/is currently suffering from a postpartum mood disorder.

When: Wednesday, May 29 at 7:30 p.m.

Where: Scotch Plains JCC, 1391 Martine Avenue, Scotch Plains, NJ 07076

RSVP: Courtney Teicher via cteicher@jccng.org or 908-889-8800 x227

After the film there will be a panel discussion comprised of the following individuals (note that Dr Birndorf and Dr. Levine were on The Today Show on August 3, 2018, which focused on Dr. Levine’s experience as a new father with PPD.  Click here for my blog post about that):

  • Film Executive Producers: Eamon Harrington and Veronica Brady
  • David Levine, MD:  Summit Medical Group physician
  • Catherine Birndorf, MD – Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Obstetrics/Gynecology and founding director of the Payne Whitney Women’s Program at The New York Presbyterian Hospital – Weill Cornell Medical Center in Manhattan.  She is also a co-founder of The Motherhood Center).  I’d met her previously at a Postpartum Support International (PSI) conference.

Speaking of PSI, there will be information and individuals on-hand to provide information about the non-profit international organization.

 

 

Sounds of Silence 11th Annual Run/Walk – May 11, 2019

Join the Sounds of Silence, Friends of the Postpartum Resource Center of New York’s 11th annual run/walk in memory and celebration of Lisa Mary Reilly and help raise funds in the effort to increase awareness of perinatal mood disorders, such as postpartum depression (PPD), postpartum OCD, and postpartum psychosis.   Not only is this for an excellent cause, it will be a nice opportunity to race (or walk) a beautiful 5K boardwalk along the Atlantic Ocean.

Here’s a video of last year’s run/walk:

I have posted about this annual run/walk every year since 2009.  That year, I was one of the two top fundraisers, bringing in over $1,000 (as an individual).  This annual fundraiser was started back in 2008 by sisters Erin Mascaro and Lisa Reilly. It was Lisa’s experience with PPD after the birth of her daughter–an experience so deeply painful and full of suffering (a suffering that many others like her feel forced to endure in silence) that was witnessed by Erin and other loved ones–that motivated Erin and Lisa to break the silence of PPD with the Sounds of Silence annual run/walk .

All proceeds will go towards supporting the important services the Postpartum Resource Center of New York, Inc., a 501(c)3 non-profit organization (tax ID #11-3449880), provides to new mothers and their families.  To learn more about its services, go to:  http://postpartumny.org.

Please help spread the word about this fundraiser by blogging or sharing the flyer on Facebook/Twitter.

Sponsors Needed:  They are looking for sponsors, so companies looking for opportunities to support a wonderful cause that benefits mothers and their families should seriously consider this opportunity!  Click here for more info.

All New York State schools and colleges are invited to participate!  Click here to find out more.

Date:  Saturday, May 11, 2019

Time:  Registration from 8:00-9:00; race/walk begins at 9:15 AM.  There will be a Kids Fun Run, Raffles, Pre- and post-prace refreshments.

Place:   Jones Beach State Park, Wantagh, Long Island (Field 5)

Run/Walk Registration:  $30 (adults); $20 (ages 11-18); $5 (ages 10 and under); register here.  Registration price increases after May 4th.

Virtual Participation:  For those of you who can’t make it in person, you can participate virtually by registering via this link.  $30 to participate; you get a t-shirt for participation.

What first 250 entrants and first 500 registrants will receive:  First 250 entrants will receive commemorative t-shirts, and first 500 registrants (on day of) will receive race swag bags.  There will be a post-race raffle for prizes that include gift baskets, gift certificates, etc (you need to be present to win).  All who raise $200+ will receive a Sounds of Silence beach towel.

50/50 Fundraiser:  There will be a 50/50 Fundraiser to benefit the Postpartum Resource Center of New York.  Only 300 raffle tickets will be sold.   Grand prize: $10,000; 2nd prize: $3,500; 3rd prize: $1000; 4th prize: $500.  All proceeds from this raffle will be shared equally between the winner of each prize and the Postpartum Resource Center of New York, Inc.  Click here for more info.  Click here to purchase your ticket(s) while they last. Click here to order.  NOTE: Your ticket(s) will be mailed to you. You do not need to be present to win. All prize awards noted here are based on a sale of all 300 available tickets. Actual prize award(s) is based on total number of tickets sold.

 

Parenting is hard

As a follow-up to my July 2018 post about my friend Elly Taylor’s US tour, I would like to help spread the word that PARENTING IS HARD.

 

* * * * * * * *

That’s right, parenting is NOT necessarily instinctive.

Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.

Parenting is a journey that is traveled by the new mom who learns as she goes.

And one in which the new father (or partner) learns as he goes.

Or as per Elly’s training mantra and title of her book, it’s a journey to Becoming Us.

And you, parents, need to and should take as much help as you can get along the way.

There should be no shame with that.

No one says that you need to go it all alone.

The more help you get, the better your parenting experience will be.

Trust me.

And trust Elly and everyone else that is trying to spread this truth and resources to get you that help.

The more we realize this going into parenthood, the less we are blindsided.

The more we are prepared for the twists in the parenting journey that life throws our way.

For 1 out of 7 new moms, postpartum depression (PPD) is one of the twists that they will come across on their journey.

Minimizing surprises leads to a better parenting experience and less risk of PPD.

We should want this for everyone, no?

So, please help spread the word.

PARENTING IS HARD.

 

* * * * * * * *

Check out Elly’s brand new video.
It is a very important video for all expectant and new mothers and their partners.
I just adore listening to her lovely Australian accent.

Stay tuned to a follow-up post on Elly’s 2019 tour to the United States.

 

Keys to Empowering New/Expectant Moms and Maternal Mental Health

I was talking to someone 2 days ago who mentioned that for millenials, images are the way to go to attract attention to important messages.  In this day and age of limited-word media like Twitter and other social media forums, sound bytes and visuals tend to grab people’s attentions more.  Print media — like magazines and books (like mine) and all the other books I devoured in my quest for knowledge on why postpartum depression (PPD) occurs in certain women — are going more and more by the wayside.  Just today, I stumbled across an email from Karen Kleiman, MSW, LCSW, (founder of The Postpartum Stress Center and author of numerous books on perinatal mood disorders)1 yr and 9 months ago giving me permission to use the below image on my blog.  This image grabbed my attention and I want to help circulate it.   You should too if you care about mothers.  We need images and information like this to reach more expectant mothers.  We need to ensure they are informed before they even give birth so they aren’t blindsided with PPD.

Why do I feel this information is important? My experience with PPD happened back in 2005, and I blogged about the ignorance of my OB/GYN in February 2009, just shy of 10 years ago.  It was one of my first blog posts. Unfortunately, not much has changed between then and now except for the advent of Facebook and other social media to spread the word via organizations such as Postpartum Support International (PSI), PPD survivors/advocates, social workers, therapists and others who treat perinatal mood disorders (PMDs).  I know this from the stories that come across my feed on Facebook.  I know this from talking to others whose job is to care for mothers who struggle with PMDs.  The general population doesn’t know the difference between postpartum blues and PPD because all too many doctors don’t even know the difference.  Karen Kleiman would not have needed to create the above image if she didn’t see the problem still existing with doctors misinforming PPD moms.

The care model for OB/GYNs should be mandated to include:

  1. adequate training in medical schools/residency programs to ensure doctors know how to recognize symptoms of and treat perinatal mood disorders and know the difference between the baby blues versus PPD
  2.  a 15-minute time slot in every hospital baby care/childbirth training session to go over the basics of perinatal mood disorders (PPD, postpartum anxiety, postpartum OCD, and postpartum psychosis), difference between the postpartum blues and PPD, breastfeeding realities, risk factors, importance of lining up practical/social support before baby’s arrival, insomnia as a common first symptom, etc.)
  3. being prepared to offer referrals to organizations like PSI (which has coordinators in every state that can try to help the mother find local help), maternal mental health facilities and mother/baby units (which are starting to pop up more & more around the country), PPD support groups, therapists/social workers who specialize in helping PPD moms, and even websites / blogs / Facebook groups that can provide online support
  4. screening patients for risk of perinatal mood disorders
    • prior to pregnancy – to establish a baseline of hormone levels before pregnancy and determine if the woman has a history of PMDD  or other risk factors for PPD
    • during pregnancy – consultation comprised of questions to try to detect pre-natal depression and review of a standard small booklet with images and bullet points covering the basics of perinatal mood disorders (PPD, postpartum anxiety, postpartum OCD, and postpartum psychosis), difference between the postpartum blues and PPD, breastfeeding realities, risk factors, importance of lining up practical/social support before baby’s arrival, insomnia as a common first symptom, etc.)
    • during 6-week postpartum visit – including blood work to detect iron/thyroid deficiencies and measure hormone/neurotransmitter levels, thyroid panel, Adrenal Stress Index

Click here to see my Onboarding Questionnaire, Pregnancy Questionnaire, and Postpartum Questionnaire.

As you can see, I am continuing to use my PPD experience to come up with ideas to effect change in the reproductive health care arena.  I will continue to find ways to contribute toward public awareness campaigns, as well as resource development and distribution.

Happy 10th Blogiversary and Happy Chinese New Year!

Struggling with long and endless days at work, so just briefly checking in to acknowledge these 2 significant events.

Ivy’s PPD Blog’s 10th blogiversary!

Can’t believe that it’s been TEN YEARS since I started my blog on February 5, 2009!

And what better way to kick off the lunar new year than with such a milestone!

Whether you celebrate Chinese New Year or the Lunar New Year…..I sincerely wish you the very best!

More later this week…stay tuned, and thanks for stopping by my blog!

New mothers with babies in the NICU are at increased risk of PPD – Part 2

Continuing on the topic I started on January 13th titled “New mothers with babies in the NICU are at increased risk of PPD,” I wanted to add a few points I missed earlier, inspired by a post that came across my feed recently from the Emerald Doulas website titled Preemies Parents and PMADs.  The post was authored by Carrie Banks, an Emerald Doula and one of the North Carolina state coordinators for Postpartum Support International.

Finally home from the NICU with the baby, it is natural for parents to feel anxious, now that they are responsible for their baby’s care and there are no nurses, doctors and machines tending to their baby’s care any longer.  The feeling of being fully responsible and the fear that something may go wrong can cause the parents to feel overwhelmed, especially if there are still medications, feeding and weight gain challenges, as well as physical (e.g., vision, hearing, motor skills) and cognitive development concerns.

I can recall feeling overwhelmed with having to deal with colic, cradle cap and eczema all at once.  My baby was not even a preemie, and my postpartum depression (PPD) starting once the one-week colic period ended.  So, yes, factors that cause stress during the first postpartum weeks while a new mom is still healing from childbirth can indeed lead to PPD.

The Emerald Doulas article contains great tips on addressing:

  • impaired/delayed bonding due to inability to hold the baby/feelings of fear/awkwardness of holding the baby in the NICU
  • transitioning to life at home after the NICU
  • feelings of isolation, guilt and shame
  • why getting help is important

Parents of preemies may also feel ungrateful or even guilty for seeking help for themselves, since everyone’s focus has been on the preemie baby for days, weeks or even months.  While these parents may feel like the only thing that matters is their baby to be okay, they need to remember that they need to stay strong and healthy, both mentally and physically, in order to be there for their baby!  Weeks if not months of having to stay strong for their NICU baby and for other children they may have can chip away until suddenly they find themselves unable to keep it together any longer.  Being anxious and sleep-deprived over an extended period can lead to a postpartum mood and anxiety disorder (PMAD) to set in.

Another contributing factor to the development of a PMAD is the feeling of isolation that occurs from staying home with the baby and keeping visitors away to protect the baby against germs, especially during the winter when colds and the flu abound.  The disappointment that comes from not having friends and family around like they would’ve wanted to have can also contribute toward the development of a PMAD.  Finding a community and support in the form of a NICU support group in-person and/or online can be invaluable, as it can help them feel less alone and more hopeful knowing they are not along in their experience both inside and outside of the NICU having to deal with physical/cognitive development concerns/challenges in addition to the seemingly endless visits with doctors, speech therapists, occupational therapists and/or physical therapists.

There should be no doubt as to whether seeking help is an option.  If you need help, do not hesitate to get it.  Reach out to friends and relatives.  See if you can get a friend and/or relative to help coordinate the search for specific kinds of help.  I’ve seen many situations where a friend sets up a Meal Train account and shares it on social media or email to get friends/relatives/neighbors/colleagues to pitch in money or orders from local restaurants/delis to be sent directly to the family.  If you need help with overnight care and you can afford to hire a postpartum doula, then see if you can locate one through referral from a friend/relative or by searching for one on the Doulas of North America (DONA) website.

You, my dear mother (and father), need to remember self care!

Traditional Postpartum Practices Workshop – Jan, Feb, Mar 2019

Come check out this special 2-day workshop that will teach you what a holistic after-birth recovery plan–one that is based on Malaysian traditions that have led to the lowest rates of postpartum mood and anxiety disorders (PMAD) in the world at 3%–should look like that is based on the world’s #1 postpartum healing practices.  In the United States PMADs occur in as many as 1 in 7, or 14% of new mothers. By the end of the training, you will know how to create an effective daily plan encompassing specialized nutrition, body massages, abdominal wraps, herbs, and other treatments to help a new mother’s body to recover in a stronger, faster and more balanced manner during the first 6 weeks postpartum.

During her many years living abroad in Malaysia, Valerie Lynn conducted extensive research on postpartum practices via the Ministry of Health, Traditional Complementary Medicine Department of the Malaysian government, as well as via interviews in hospitals and in the field.  She learned that the detailed and thorough care that is provided to new mothers during the first 44-days postpartum is unrivaled.  She witnessed firsthand how quickly mothers recovered from childbirth from the postpartum care they were provided.

Learn for yourself and/or to help other mothers reduce the amount of time needed to recover from childbirth!

A Note to Corporations re: maternity leave and how to maximize employee potential:  Click here for more info.  She can do corporate lunch seminars..just reach out to her via valerie@postpregnacywellness.com for more information on how to coordinate this!

When:
January 24-25, 2019
February 21-22, 2019
March 21-22, 2019
Options are to attend day 1 or both day 1 and day 2 (contact Valerie Lynn at valerie@postpregnacywellness.com for latest rates.

Where:  (Photo ID is required to enter)
Consulate General of Malaysia
313 E 43rd St
New York, New York 10017

To Register:
Please email valerie@postpregnacywellness.com for payment link.  Your full name, company name, address, and telephone are required.  Click here for more info.

About Valerie Lynn:
Author of The Mommy Plan (endorsed by many childbirth educational organizations and is listed as a choice of required reading for Postpartum Doula certification by the Childbirth and Postpartum Professionals Association (CAPPA)Valerie Lynn is an expert on employing a blend of the most effective eastern and western postpartum recovery practices to help new mothers through their physical and hormonal recovery from childbirth.  These practices have been proven to greatly reduce the amount of time needed for new moms to heal.  It was during her own 15-month experience with postpartum anxiety and OCD (obsessive compulsive disorder) after the birth of her son in 2007 that Valerie turned to traditional feminine healthcare to re-balance her post-baby hormones and heal herself naturally through herbs, massage and diet.  She was living in Malaysia at the time. Valerie has held positions such as Executive Director of the American Malaysian Chamber of Commerce and Principal of VLM Consultancy where she was provided strategic consultancy services for foreign companies entering the Malaysian and APEC markets.  She is part of the Board of Directors of the distinguished Malaysian NGO YASNITA, “Women’s Pathway to Success” where she serves as an International Advisor on Postpartum Recovery Practices. She is International Country (PSI) Volunteer Co-coordinator for Malaysia of Postpartum Support International, a global organization in 138 countries. She is a Board Member of the International Maternity Institute and the After Birth Project in the U.S. Valerie regularly contributes to articles, books, and training programs. She aspires to improve the healing-care of new mothers in the United States and globally which, she believes, will reduce the high rates of postpartum depression. She is an approved speaker for Johnson & Johnson.