April 13, 2010 is 4th Anniversary of New Jersey’s Postpartum Depression Law

Four years ago today, New Jersey became the first state in the country to pass legislation requiring healthcare professionals to educate and screen all new mothers for postpartum depression (PPD). 

Since then, New Jersey’s Dept of Health and Senior Services’ Speak Up When You’re Down campaign has:

The key to helping mothers and their families minimize the risk (or effects, if it does occur) of PPD is early identification (via screening) and education (via awareness campaigns and ensuring healthcare providers are all aware).   Through knowledge of risk factors, symptoms, and services available locally, mothers and their families will be able to recognize sumptoms of PPD early on, as well as take immediate action to ensure proper diagnosis and treatment.

I’d just like to clarify what screening is.  It sounds like poking and prodding is involved.  No, women are not treated like lab rats or anything like that.  Screening is merely a doctor proactively asking some questions to ascertain whether a new mother entrusted to his care is exhibiting any signs of PPD.   The most widely-used screening tool for PPD is The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), which many hospitals in New Jersey have elected to use.   It’s also important to note that, though doctors are required to screen all new mothers in their care, a mother has the right to refuse to answer some or all of the questions. 

I wish this legislation were in effect back when I had my daughter!  There are many others that feel the same way as I do.  Before this legislation went into effect four years ago, some doctors were already asking all new moms fundamental questions at each visit to ascertain if there are any symptoms of PPD, since after all it does occur in as many as one in eight new mothers!  One of the reasons why this legislation was necessary is because there are still so many doctors out there who don’t go the extra mile where their patients are concerned–and worse fail to diagnose PPD properly.  The screening should currently be taking place as the new mom leaves the hospital after having her baby, plus at her 6-week follow-up with her OB/GYN.   Since so many cases of PPD develop before the six-week follow-up visit, at some point–and I fear this may never happen because it would require a huge change in health insurance and ACOG (and whatever other organization that would have anything to do with this) — a 3- or 4-week follow-up visit becomes a requirement/standard.    What a HUGE difference this would make, wouldn’t it?!   Maybe if enough people push for this, it will happen.  One can only hope…and dream.