New mothers with babies in the NICU are at increased risk of PPD – Part 2

Continuing on the topic I started on January 13th titled “New mothers with babies in the NICU are at increased risk of PPD,” I wanted to add a few points I missed earlier, inspired by a post that came across my feed recently from the Emerald Doulas website titled Preemies Parents and PMADs.  The post was authored by Carrie Banks, an Emerald Doula and one of the North Carolina state coordinators for Postpartum Support International.

Finally home from the NICU with the baby, it is natural for parents to feel anxious, now that they are responsible for their baby’s care and there are no nurses, doctors and machines tending to their baby’s care any longer.  The feeling of being fully responsible and the fear that something may go wrong can cause the parents to feel overwhelmed, especially if there are still medications, feeding and weight gain challenges, as well as physical (e.g., vision, hearing, motor skills) and cognitive development concerns.

I can recall feeling overwhelmed with having to deal with colic, cradle cap and eczema all at once.  My baby was not even a preemie, and my postpartum depression (PPD) starting once the one-week colic period ended.  So, yes, factors that cause stress during the first postpartum weeks while a new mom is still healing from childbirth can indeed lead to PPD.

The Emerald Doulas article contains great tips on addressing:

  • impaired/delayed bonding due to inability to hold the baby/feelings of fear/awkwardness of holding the baby in the NICU
  • transitioning to life at home after the NICU
  • feelings of isolation, guilt and shame
  • why getting help is important

Parents of preemies may also feel ungrateful or even guilty for seeking help for themselves, since everyone’s focus has been on the preemie baby for days, weeks or even months.  While these parents may feel like the only thing that matters is their baby to be okay, they need to remember that they need to stay strong and healthy, both mentally and physically, in order to be there for their baby!  Weeks if not months of having to stay strong for their NICU baby and for other children they may have can chip away until suddenly they find themselves unable to keep it together any longer.  Being anxious and sleep-deprived over an extended period can lead to a postpartum mood and anxiety disorder (PMAD) to set in.

Another contributing factor to the development of a PMAD is the feeling of isolation that occurs from staying home with the baby and keeping visitors away to protect the baby against germs, especially during the winter when colds and the flu abound.  The disappointment that comes from not having friends and family around like they would’ve wanted to have can also contribute toward the development of a PMAD.  Finding a community and support in the form of a NICU support group in-person and/or online can be invaluable, as it can help them feel less alone and more hopeful knowing they are not along in their experience both inside and outside of the NICU having to deal with physical/cognitive development concerns/challenges in addition to the seemingly endless visits with doctors, speech therapists, occupational therapists and/or physical therapists.

There should be no doubt as to whether seeking help is an option.  If you need help, do not hesitate to get it.  Reach out to friends and relatives.  See if you can get a friend and/or relative to help coordinate the search for specific kinds of help.  I’ve seen many situations where a friend sets up a Meal Train account and shares it on social media or email to get friends/relatives/neighbors/colleagues to pitch in money or orders from local restaurants/delis to be sent directly to the family.  If you need help with overnight care and you can afford to hire a postpartum doula, then see if you can locate one through referral from a friend/relative or by searching for one on the Doulas of North America (DONA) website.

You, my dear mother (and father), need to remember self care!

New mothers with babies in the NICU are at increased risk of PPD

The motivation for this blog post is a Huffpost article that popped up in my Facebook feed yesterday titled “NICU Moms Are Struggling With Mental Health Problems–And They Aren’t Getting Help” by Catherine Pearson.  It happens to be from 4/13/2018, but I’m only seeing it now for the first time.

I have blogged about the many risk factors for PPD before.  One of the risk factors happens to be premature births.  Last time I blogged about premature births being one of the risk factors for PPD was 9 years ago.  So, I’m way overdue blogging about this topic again!

A new mother who was pregnant one minute–and expecting several more weeks of pregnancy–and suddenly giving birth and seeing your baby hooked up to machines is an overwhelmingly anxiety-provoking experience.  All new mothers are not only hormonal, exhausted and trying to recover from childbirth, but NICU mothers are also anxious about their babies, unwilling to leave their babies’ sides, and find it hard to eat, sleep or even talk to friends and family members who don’t fully understand what it’s like to have a baby in the NICU. Unable to touch, hold and feed her baby and instead seeing her tiny, precious baby hooked up to so many wires, it is natural for a NICU mother to be consumed with feelings of helplessness, distress and fear.  Each day, the NICU mother spends many hours each day at their baby’s side, pumping every few hours, and on high alert with respect to her baby’s breathing and the noises of the machines keeping her baby alive.

In the daily hustle and bustle of the nurses and doctors in the NICU, having them stop and ask the mother (and/or father) how they are holding up and making sure they are taking care of themselves and getting enough rest are not going to be at the forefront of their priorities, though you’d think it should be second nature for them to do so.  In fact, they are seldom trained to know what to ask.  Even if they did ask, there is an inadequate referral system in place to get help for a mother with a postpartum mood disorder.

“…[Studies have suggested that up to 70 percent of women whose babies spend time in the NICU experience some degree of postpartum depression, while up to one-quarter may experience symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder.”  Simply put, a new mother’s risk of experiencing a postpartum mood disorder is very high.  And that is not surprising in the least.”

What should the screening entail?

I’ve previously blogged about and will repeat here that mothers should be assessed for postpartum depression (PPD) between 4-12 weeks postpartum.   She should be encouraged to have her six-week follow-up visit with her OB/GYN, provided she doesn’t complain about symptoms up to that point.  If she is symptomatic before the six-week visit, she should be screened right then.  If the 6-week screen doesn’t indicate PPD, she should be assessed once more at the 12-week point and also when she weans and when her period returns, since these events can trigger PPD in some women.

The following—in addition to screening tools like the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale or Cheryl Beck’s Postpartum Depression Screening Scale—should be asked at the six-week follow-up visit with the OB/GYN, which can help diagnose PPD:

1. Have you been feeling any of the following for the past 2 weeks:

  • Persistent and mostly inexplicable sadness/tearfulness and feeling empty inside
  • Loss of interest/pleasure in hobbies/activities you once enjoyed; inability to laugh
  • Overall impaired functioning
  • Sleep difficulties (either insomnia or sleeping too much)
  • Weight loss (usually fairly quick) associated with a decrease in appetite
  • Weight gain associated with an increase in appetite
  • Excessive worrying/anxiety/concern about the baby
  • Restlessness/irritability
  • Difficulty thinking, concentrating or making decisions
  • Onset of panic attacks
  • Sense of despair and/or hopelessness leading to thoughts of death/suicide

2. How have you been feeling physically and emotionally?

3.  How is your appetite?

4.  How are you sleeping?  Have you been able to get at least 4, if not 5, hours of sleep a night?

5.  Have you had any recurring thoughts/images that are disturbing?

 

If local resources for PPD are not readily available (though all hospitals around the country should have a list of local psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, registered nurses, PPD support groups on hand), the least they can do is provide a pamphlet for Postpartum Support International. Its website lists resources in every state.  And many states have already formed, or are in the process of forming, chapters to focus on state-specific efforts at advocacy, training, and other improvements.

If you are a new mom with a baby in the NICU, please, please, please remember that, though your attention is preoccupied with your baby, if you let your own strength and health go by the wayside, it is possible to succumb to a postpartum mood disorder.  Not everyone will succumb, but just remember the increased risk and higher occurrence among NICU moms.  Don’t forget to take care of yourself.  When your baby comes out of the NICU, you need to be strong and healthy to care for your baby.

 

 

Lenox Hill Hospital, Say It Isn’t So…..

Is it true?  What?  All the noise about Beyonce giving birth to her baby girl, Blue Ivy–oh, what a beautiful name (I mean the Ivy part, ahem)–at Lenox Hill Hospital in Manhattan, a very BUSY hospital in one of the largest cities in the world….a hospital that supposedly accepted $1.3 million from Beyonce and her hubs Jay-Z to have a whole floor to themselves.  That’s not all, the NICU–or neonatal intensive care unit–is on that floor!  The NICU is where preemies and babies with congenital conditions needing urgent care stay until they are well enough to leave the hospital.

This leads to parents with babies in the NICU not only being inconvenienced, but stressed out more than they already were because they couldn’t visit their babies without having security guards getting in their way.  Parents like Neil Coulon (just one of  the 3 examples I’ve read about) who was supposedly prevented from visiting his preemie twins in the NICU over the past weekend, couldn’t walk the floors without bumping into and being questioned by security guards, and whose visitors got booted out of the waiting room by those security guards. 

I just can’t believe Lenox Hill Hospital would allow something like this to happen.  It’s one thing to have security guards in front of Beyonce’s room.  It’s another thing entirely when they take over an entire floor that includes the NICU!  Money or no money, Lenox Hill Hospital should have taken all the other parents and their babies into consideration.   Seems the hospital forgot its other patients in the face of such celebrity presence…oh, and the $1.3 million.  If this is in fact true, then shame on them!

It is critical that parents be able to visit their babies in the NICU….both for the babies’ sake and for the parents’ sake.  The babies need to feel their parents’ loving touches, albeit through glass and gloves…while the parents need to be by their babies’ sides physically and emotionally.  As I mentioned in previous posts about postpartum depression risk ractors, the new mom with a baby in the NICU is at heightened risk to the high levels of stress that persists for as long as the baby is in critical condition.  Click here and here .

Hell, this couple is so loaded, why couldn’t they just pay Beyonce’s OB/GYN and staff to go to her house and deliver the baby there?  Oh, that’s right….she had a C-section, which probably requires special equipment in the standard OR (and to reduce the risk of something going wrong and the subsequent lawsuit).  If she hadn’t opted for a C-section, a midwife (or Beyonce’s OB/GYN and some nurses) could’ve performed an in-home delivery.

If I were a new mom in the hospital and my baby was in the NICU and I was prohibited from visiting my baby–and God forbid I couldn’t get to the baby and the baby was experiencing a setback–my husband and I would’ve contacted a lawyer by now.